We will host online Ikebana courses soon.Learn Ikebana anywhere, anytime

Sunday, 28 February 2016

Daily Meditation


Daily Meditation: Shoso's Diary 
3 March 2016: Ikebana & Prosecco http://bit.ly/1JDMUmp
3 March 2016: Sanctuary exhibition Opening. Shoso's home garden will be featured. http://www.gleneira.vic.gov.au/…/Arts-a…/Gallery/Exhibitions  
4 March 2016: Popup tearoom with Yumi Umiumare http://fola.com.au/program/popup-tearoom-series/

http://www.shoso.com.au 
https://www.facebook.com/ikebanaaustralia

Tuesday, 23 February 2016


Wednesday, 17 February 2016

Tuesday, 16 February 2016

Which Ikebana Course?



Shoso Shimbo teaches 2 types of Ikebana courses in 2016. Which course is the best for you?


1. Japanese Aesthetics: From Ikebana to Contemporary Art

This class is available for anyone (not just for RMIT students) and will take participants on a journey to explore the theory of Japanese aesthetics through practical exercises.

Ikebana is an entrance to learn various aspects of Japanese arts including gardening, architecture, painting, food presentation, our Tea ceremony, Kimono designs and varieties of our sculpture.


The course starts with a couple of Ikebana lessons to learn its basic principles. Then participants are introduced to various projects such as branch sculpture, wire sculpture, paper sculpture, collage and abstract drawings.


Each lesson consists of a video viewing on Japanese art & design, analytical discussion focusing on one significant Japanese artwork and a practical exercise/project.


This course is for those who have no experience in Ikebana as well as for advanced Ikebana students. In particular this course is useful for landscape designers, graphic designers, interior designers, fashion designers and sculptors.

Duration: 3 hours per session
When: Commencing on 27 April, 20 July & 12 October in 2016
Where: Carlton, RMIT University
Details: http://bit.ly/1IFmuyl
Students' works: http://www.shoso.com.au/2016/02/japanese-aesthetics.html 


2. Certified Ikebana Course: Make Ikebana part of your life

This is for both a novice and those who intend to obtain teaching qualification in Ikebana. 
Please visit our Tuition page for details.

Duration: 1 hour and a half per session
When: 3 sessions per week (Pick one or more each week)
Where: Murrumbeena
Students' works: 
http://ikebanaaustralia.blogspot.com.au
https://www.facebook.com/IkebanaGallery/

3. Customised Ikebana Workshop

We can organise an Ikebana workshop on your special occasion such as a hen’s party or special birthday.
Students' works: 
http://www.shoso.com.au/2015/08/ikebana-for-hens-party.html 
Details: http://www.shoso.com.au/p/workshop.html

http://www.shoso.com.au
https://www.facebook.com/ikebanaaustralia



Japanese Aesthetics




Japanese Aesthetics: From Ikebana to Contemporary Art

This class is available for anyone (not just for RMIT students) and will take participants on a journey to explore the theory of Japanese aesthetics through practical exercises.
Ikebana is an entrance to learn various aspects of Japanese arts including gardening, architecture, painting, food presentation, tea ceremony, the wearing of the Kimono and varieties of our sculpture.


The course starts with a couple of Ikebana lessons to learn its basic principles. Then participants are introduced to various projects such as branch sculpture, wire sculpture, paper sculpture, collage and abstract drawings.


Each lesson consists of a video viewing on Japanese art & design, analytical discussion focusing on one significant Japanese artwork and a practical exercise.

This course is for those who have no experience in Ikebana as well as for advanced Ikebana students. In particular this course is useful for landscape designers, graphic designers, interior designers, and sculptors.

Duration: 3 hours per session
When: 27 April, 20 July & 12 October in 2016
Where: Carlton, RMIT University
Details: http://bit.ly/1IFmuyl


http://www.shoso.com.au
https://www.facebook.com/ikebanaaustralia

Ikebana and Prosecco


Ikebana and Prosecco: Essence of Ikebana

Learn the essence of Ikebana in 3 workshops. On arrival enjoy a glass of Prosecco. Bring nothing and leave with flower arrangements worth over $150.

This course is ideal for those who have no Ikebana experience and would like to learn its essence quickly in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. The course consists of 3 workshops: Introduction to Ikebana (Level 1), Harmony in Ikebana (Level 2) and Contrast in Ikebana (Level 3).
Participants can choose any workshop. They can also attend a workshop in any order or one level multiple times.


Participants will learn that many Ikebana principles are applicable to many other fields in art and design.
Duration: 2 hours per session
When:11 February (Level 1), 3 March (Level 2), 14 April (Level 3), 2016
We will have a workshop monthly. Level 1 in May and June, Level 2 in July and Level 3 in August. Details will be announced shortly.Where: Mondopiero, 28 Brunswick St, Fitzroy
Details: http://bit.ly/1JDMUmp


http://www.shoso.com.au
https://www.facebook.com/ikebanaaustralia

Wednesday, 10 February 2016

Ikebana Today 44


I have been writing about contemporary art, particularly about how important it is to have meaning, which depends on the context of the work. The question now is what is context? Takashi Murakami wrote an excellent book on the subject, “Geijutsu Tosoron”. Terry Barrett, in his book Making Art (2011), says that intrinsic context mainly refers to “the juxtaposition of parts within the whole and the meanings they evoke through proximity to one another”(p.16). Extrinsic context includes the life history of the artist, “the time and place in which the work is made” (p.17), and the art history.

I will try to follow the way that Murakami explained the concept of context in his book. Although I’m aware that this is not the best sample, I will talk about the sculpture I made to promote the Archibald exhibition at the Art Gallery of Ballarat in 2015.

This was a great challenge for me, particularly because the request was to make a human head. I have never made a human head before. Ikebana is mainly about abstract forms. Even Kiku Ningyo do not try to make human heads with flowers. When I made a test work, I was disappointed to realised that I could not do this. However, then I though, why shouldn’t I enjoy this rare opportunity without worrying about what other people think about my work? I decided to use a different strategy. When I attached some irregular massed wire balls, the face started to look alive. I thought this might work.

What was the context of this work? I’ll follow this up in the next issue.

http://www.shoso.com.au
https://www.facebook.com/ikebanaaustralia


Thursday, 4 February 2016